Author: Keystone Technologies

What Kind of Infrastructure Does Senior Living Need?

What Kind of Infrastructure Does Senior Living Need?

Standard IT infrastructure usually consists of hardware that includes servers, computers, data centers, switches, hubs, and routers. It also includes software, which encompasses an array of applications, and networks that provide the access to the Internet. IT infrastructure also requires people to provide the planning, design, maintenance, and support for IT.

Today’s senior living spaces require a well-planned infrastructure that includes network-optimizing appliances and advanced wireless design to effectively and securely connect networks while also integrating voice, video, and data needs. Front-end UI/UX software development, sensor integration, server, storage and networking technology, advanced routing, and switching capabilities are also key for organizations that want to stay ahead of their competition and offer the highest levels of care and service. Read More

For EHR Data Architects, It’s The Process, Not The EHR Provider

Over the last decade, adoption of EHR systems has increased dramatically among providers. While many healthcare providers have made the shift from paper to electronic health records, there has simultaneously been a growing need among healthcare organizations to change EHR providers. The two largest reasons for this change in systems are dissatisfaction and mergers and acquisitions. Read More

For EHR Data Architects, It’s The Process, Not The EHR Provider

Preventive Care with Passive Health Monitoring

By their nature, traditional nurse call systems are reactive. Not only do they only respond to an incident that has already occurred, these systems require residents to take specific action during a crisis (when their abilities might be diminished).

Monitoring via environmentally embedded sensors takes the notion of resident care, safety, and caregiver alerts to a whole new level. In passive health monitoring, AI is employed to gather and analyze information on a range of health indicators. Residents do not need to activate the systems. Staff can be entirely hands-off until an alert is registered. Just as information is collected automatically, AI software uses it to continuously create a dynamic picture of a resident’s vital information, analyzing data over time in order to learn the patterns indicative of wellness and those that may signify potential danger.

Given the powerful potential of this technology, there are many benefits to the resident, staff, family, and operators. However, the biggest win may very well be better clinical outcomes. With its potential for preventive care, passive monitoring offers the possibility of keeping residents out of the hospital and helping them to remain independent in their residences for longer. Read More

Preventive Care with Passive Health Monitoring
5 Reasons Data is a Priority During a Merger or Acquisition

5 Reasons Data is a Priority During a Merger or Acquisition

The last two decades have seen significant consolidation among health systems, hospitals, and private medical practices. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) encouraged mergers and acquisitions in order to decrease healthcare spending by eliminating duplication, standardizing treatment protocols, and incentivizing better utilization. As a result, there has been a surge of Merger and Acquisition (M&A) activity in healthcare since the ACA became law.

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What Happens When a Senior Falls?

As the population ages and people live longer in bad shape, the number of older Americans who fall and suffer serious, even fatal, injuries is soaring.” As fall numbers continue to climb, each year, 2.8 million older people are treated in emergency departments and approximately 800,000 older people are hospitalized for fall injuries.  Adjusted for inflation, the direct medical costs for fall injuries are $31 billion annually. Hospital costs account for two-thirds of the total.

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What Happens When a Senior Falls?