Preventive Care with Passive Health Monitoring

By their nature, traditional nurse call systems are reactive. Not only do they only respond to an incident that has already occurred, these systems require residents to take specific action during a crisis (when their abilities might be diminished).

Monitoring via environmentally embedded sensors takes the notion of resident care, safety, and caregiver alerts to a whole new level. In passive health monitoring, AI is employed to gather and analyze information on a range of health indicators. Residents do not need to activate the systems. Staff can be entirely hands-off until an alert is registered. Just as information is collected automatically, AI software uses it to continuously create a dynamic picture of a resident’s vital information, analyzing data over time in order to learn the patterns indicative of wellness and those that may signify potential danger.

Given the powerful potential of this technology, there are many benefits to the resident, staff, family, and operators. However, the biggest win may very well be better clinical outcomes. With its potential for preventive care, passive monitoring offers the possibility of keeping residents out of the hospital and helping them to remain independent in their residences for longer. Continue reading “Preventive Care with Passive Health Monitoring”

Who Benefits From Passive Health Monitoring?

Senior housing operators for many years turned to buttons, pull cords and other nurse call systems, as effective, but rudimentary, solutions to address seniors’ increased fall risk. Although workable in some ways, these systems have continuously fallen short in many important areas, including timeliness, capability, and productivity. Continue reading “Who Benefits From Passive Health Monitoring?”

Questions to Ask When Considering Remote Monitoring or Alert Systems

Passive remote monitoring systems are game-changers when it comes to the safety and health of residents. These systems are built around discrete, often environmentally embedded sensors (typically motion, depth, and pressure sensors) that are connected to a powerful computer system that can detect falls, illnesses, and other emergencies. Continue reading “Questions to Ask When Considering Remote Monitoring or Alert Systems”

How To Use Technology to Promote Senior Independence

For seniors, independence is a crucial element in health and wellness. One study found that 94 percent of retirees say independence is a major source of satisfaction. The ability to manage independently helps improve mood, while simultaneously stimulating ongoing physical well-being.

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Resident Isolation in Senior Living: Is Technology the Solution?

Senior care professionals know that while science proves that isolation for aging adults can lead to increased depression and even memory loss acceleration, it can still be difficult to bring residents out of their apartments and into the life of the community. Residents move into a community for many unique reasons, but healthy socialization may not be at the top of their priority lists. Instead, seniors may isolate due to illness, decreased mobility, self esteem issues, or an introverted personality.

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The 3 Ways Remote Monitoring Technology Fosters Senior Independence

Having spent decades caring for others, it is hardly surprising to discover that in their later years, older adults want to care for themselves. While age may put some limitations on one’s activities, seniors still expect autonomy, independence, the ability to manage and govern their own daily tasks.

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Why Independence and IT Infrastructure Go Hand in Hand in Senior Living

As we go through life’s changes, there’s a natural urge to want to remain in control – of ourselves, our lives, our interactions with others. In seniors this sense of control is referred to broadly as “independence,” the ability to be the master of one’s own fate.

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Keeping Seniors Independent: What Housing Operators Must Know

The “Aging in Place in America” study asked seniors about their greatest fears surrounding aging. While only three percent of seniors said that death is their greatest fear, loss of independence was named as the greatest fear by twenty-six percent of seniors.

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3 Services Communities Can Provide to Promote Senior Independence

Seniors view their independence as a major quality-of-life metric. One study found that 94 percent of retirees say independence is a major source of satisfaction. No one wants to feel hemmed in by the physical or social limitations that seem to be inevitable with aging.

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Using Care Coordination to Help Senior Housing Residents Retain Their Independence

Seniors seek to remain independent, and their caregivers want to support that goal. At the same time, there are factors working against greater independence. Part of it comes down to the nature of aging.

Declining health inevitably takes its toll on independence. At the same time, the nature of health care delivery may also work against greater independence.

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